Comics With Happy Endings (SPOILERS)

HEADS UP! This post has spoilers for every comic mentioned in it! Read it at your own risk!

I was asked on Instagram a while ago for recommendations for comics with happy endings. I was shocked by how difficult it was to compile a list; most of my comics are sad sack indie comics. I was genuinely surprised that most of the positive graphic novels I owned with happy endings were created by women (but I shouldn’t be, I will have a future post about how my taste has changed in the last few years, and how so much of the comics I used to love and now have no patience for are morose bullshit by sad white straight boys).

Here’s a list in no particular order:

I Thought You Hated Me by MariNaomi

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This short book published by (my favorite publisher) Retrofit is my fave work by MariNaomi. It’s a short form comic told through a series of vignettes about a relationship that starts out antagonistically in childhood and then follows it as it transforms into a friendship over the course of 30 years. MariNaomi and her friend lose touch and then reconnect and the relationship starts to take on more significance. It ends with the two supporting each other. It’s a quiet story that is about one of my favorite topics: female friendships!

Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto

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I have written about this book before here. This is a memoir where Marchetto battles and survives breast cancer. She learns (to a point)  that her superficial priorities before cancer are fucked up and to have more empathy towards other women. It is a very good book by someone I would never want to hang out with. And, before you ask if every cancer memoir has a happy ending because they are all survival stories, the answer is no, they don’t.

The Amazing True Story Of A Teenage Single Mom by Katherine Arnoldi

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I’m glad to see this book is in print again. It’s the story of how Arnoldi became pregnant via date rape, had the child, and the lengths she went through to provide for her kid and fulfill her dream of going to college. She deals with abuse, homelessness, and all sorts of other bullshit. She is unbelievably perseverant though, and never comprimises who she is. The most vivid scene for me is one where she works in a factory, moves up from working the floor to working in the main office, and discovers that the chemicals being used to make the factories products cause cancer. She tries to expose them but is ultimately fired and is literally dragged off the premises screaming. But, even through all that and more, she gets her degree and takes care of her kid.

No Love Lost by Ariel Bordeux

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So full disclosure, Ariel is my comics mentor. I chose her as my thesis advisor when I was at the Center For Cartoon Studies, and we have been close ever since. However, I chose her because I loved her work. When I wrote a guest week worth of reviews for Our Comics Ourselves ,  Ariel’s career was one of my first posts. Ariel Bordeaux was ahead of her time, and I 100% believe the only reason Ariel isn’t considered one of the premiere indie cartoonists of the ‘90s is just straight up sexism. She wrote stories that spoke to women. When she first did autobio in Deep Girl, it was super over the top and comedic. I love this work, but I totally see why men would appreciate it in a way they don’t appreciate her fiction. It’s like how every indie comic bro I know when asked about women cartoonists they like say Julie Doucet, where all of her autobio work is about crazy ass adventures and trauma told in a rock and roll way without really reflecting on it. Ariel’s fiction though (and later autobio work) are all about the way people interact with each other and how their dynamics work. The best comic in Deep Girl is about a pair of friends that are trying to stay together despite growing apart and how painful that is, along with a really honest look at rejection. Anyway, ‘90s indie guys don’t care about emotions unless it’s about how male authors are talking about being misanthropic.

OKAY RANT OVER FOR NOW (BECAUSE I PROMISE I WILL BE GETTING BACK TO IT IN A FUTURE POST)!

Anyway, No Love Lost  is a story about a woman in a shitty relationship. He’s not a jerk or anything, they just do not fit well together. She is trying to make her relationship work at the expense of all of her friends. The two finally break up, and both parties are better off for it. The protagonist apologizes to her friends and they reconcile. It’s a great book that Drawn and Quarterly didn’t market properly or know what to do with when it was published because they were too busy promoting Joe Matt’s work where he gives his girlfriend a black eye and fetishizes women (but! like! he hates himself too! So it’s TOTALLY FUNNY AND COOL!).

A Mess Of Everything by Miss Lasko-Gross

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This is part two of an autobiographical series by Lasko-Gross, the first being Escape From Special . The first book highlights her years in elementary school. In that book, she goes from being a happy kid to essentially getting more and more burdened with society’s expectations of her and the labels that come with those expectations. A Mess of Things follows her throughout high school. I haven’t read my copies of these books in years, but the part that stuck with me is when Lasko-Gross confronts her best friend about having an eating disorder (among other things) because she loves her, followed by her friend getting defensive and dropping Lasko-Gross completely. Lasko-Gross shows how painful that is, and she goes from feeling like an outcast with an ally to completely, utterly alone. The story turns around almost at the very end, where she moves to NYC and loves it because it’s full of eccentrics like her (which, I’m not gonna lie, I felt    was a tired-ass trope when I read it middle school when I first got the book) and receives a letter from her best friend apologizing for the way she acted and asks for forgiveness, and tells Lasko-Gross how much she loves her. Lasko-Gross is moved and immediately forgives her.

Girls With Slingshots By Danielle Corsetto

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My boyfriend talks about how much he hated American comics until the mid 2000s when women started dominating the scene and started telling a wide variety of stories. I will not repeat my GWS review, it can be found on my Tumblr here. But I will just say this printed omnibus is probably the most gorgeous designed books I own, minus the books I own designed by Seth or Chris Ware.

And now, surprisingly enough, are two of the few graphic novels with happy endings I own created by dudes:

Hicksville by Dylan Horrocks

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Hicksville is a phenomenal piece of work but is also very niche. I generally am not a fan of a work of any art form that is a love letter to their type of art form (which is why so many Oscar-bait movies are, “meh” to me; I don’t need to see a movie about how great movies are and the only reason it gets nominated is because everyone that votes for the Oscars are in the movies business). There are multiple examples of comics that celebrate comics and the act of cartooning that I am lukewarm on at best. Hicksville is a rare exception to this because it not only celebrates comics but also points out the flaws in them. 

The protagonist of this book is a reporter that goes to a small remote town where his cartoonist idol is from in order to do a story about him. When he arrives, he finds that the town is intricately linked with comics, and that his idol had stolen the a superhero character that launched his career from a secret work of another amazing but now dead cartoonist. His idol changed his superhero’s story from a one off into a series and had taken all the credit. He is disowned by the town for this act, but the reporter doesn’t know any of this so he is constantly pissing off the town’s inhabitants. When he discovers what his idol has done, he confronts him but doesn’t write a story about his plagerism because it will reveal and thus destroy the beauty of the town. The good guys grow and are happier for getting to know each other and move past this secret, and the bad guy gets confronted and while he will continue to hold good public standing the audience knows that an outsider of Hicksville knowing his fraudulent past eats away at him.

The best part of the ending is the fact that the reporter doesn’t go public with his idol’s misdoings. He realizes the town of Hicksville is so special that compromising it in any way isn’t worth the justice of calling out one prominent but shitty cartoonist.

Patience by Daniel Clowes

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Before spoiling the ending to Patience, a quick word about Daniel Clowes. I was an angsty artist teen when I saw Ghost World (so I was doomed to be obsessed with it), so I give Clowes a pass when I don’t like some of his work for all the same reasons I hate other’ 90s indie boy comic stuff of the same ilk. I will say this: Clowes, while having a consistent feel and style to his large body of work, plays with mood, genre, and tone in a way most of his peers don’t. That is why, while I hate a few of his books (I don’t even think I could rant about David Boring because it doesn’t make a strong enough impression on me to hate it as much as it bummed me out for wasting my time reading it) I like the majority of his books (even some the really cynical dark ones). He is in the top tier of his generation of cartoonists for a reason, and I think he is one of the most relevant cartoonists that started in that era. 

Patience is about a man who’s wife is murdered, and he travels through time to save her. He succeeds, and while the version of himself that saves her dissipates (she no longer gets murdered, so he can’t exist, because of time travel logic and blah blah blah), before becoming completely obliterated he gets to see the version of himself with his newly saved wife live a life together and feels contentment. While one could argue that this is a bittersweet ending because the protagonist that we follow doesn’t get to enjoy the fruits of his labor in the fact that he can’t spend the rest of his life with his wife, I think the relief that he feels from protecting the woman he loves from such a horrible death is more moving and an overall more uplifting way to end the book.

OK! COOL!   These are the pretty much the only books on my bookshelf that I could find with happy endings. For reference, here are the books I chose from:

This isn’t even CLOSE to my entire book collection!

This isn’t even CLOSE to my entire book collection!

You would think this wouldn’t have been so hard! But yeah, indie comics value sad and negative emotions in my opinion, the audience thinks it adds more gravitas (just like how comedies don’t win Oscars). The cool thing is, after reading some of my books, particularly my anthologies, from the early 2000s vs the mid 2000s vs now, the sad sack indie comic is a dying trend. I will eventually do a blog post about those anthologies, but it’ll be a while.


Until next time, BYE!

Sketchbook Completed

I completed another sketchbook. I have a “lovely practice,” as my friend Christopher Kardambikis puts it, when I mentioned it during my interview on his podcast Paper Cuts. This sketchbook was given to my comics mentor Ariel Bordeaux. Ariel was my thesis advisor at the Center For Cartoon Studies and was very helpful in getting through my second year by being, “the supportive comics aunt” (her words, but a spot on description). We’ve been close ever since.

I hope she likes it!

Here are some of my favorite pages:

This is based on the way  Aline Kominsky-Crumb  (who I wrote more extensively about  here)  and  Roberta Gregory  draw their mothers in their comics.

This is based on the way Aline Kominsky-Crumb (who I wrote more extensively about here) and Roberta Gregory draw their mothers in their comics.

My go to doodle: buff or fat naked ladies.

My go to doodle: buff or fat naked ladies.

Self portrait.

Self portrait.

Various kinds of souls that leave the body.

Various kinds of souls that leave the body.

SAD SAD SAD.

SAD SAD SAD.

SAD SAD SAD 2.

SAD SAD SAD 2.

Saw this smoking hot babe while tabling at  DINK.

Saw this smoking hot babe while tabling at DINK.

Lady from a music video I watched while waiting for a friend at  Dukem  Ethiopian restaurant.

Lady from a music video I watched while waiting for a friend at Dukem Ethiopian restaurant.

Drawings I did at  Golden West Cafe  (waiting on the same friend, oddly enough). The girl on the left I saw on my walk there and the guy on the right was someone I saw in the restaurant.

Drawings I did at Golden West Cafe (waiting on the same friend, oddly enough). The girl on the left I saw on my walk there and the guy on the right was someone I saw in the restaurant.

That’s it! See ya!

A Conundrum: Art I Love By People I Loathe

I recently did the above piece for The Nib- five cartoonists talking about their problematic favorite pieces of media:

The site I refer to in the comic is called Red Letter Media, and the TV show I refer to in the third panel is  Aqua Teen Hunger Force.

The site I refer to in the comic is called Red Letter Media, and the TV show I refer to in the third panel is Aqua Teen Hunger Force.

I love these properties even though they are problematic. I would never want to hang out with the creators, because they are no doubt misogynistic and racist. I take what I like out of their work and leave the rest.

But then there’s a subset of art that always give me pause: Autobio comics I enjoy by people I find to be obnoxious women. Unlike the properties mentioned earlier, these aren’t inherently offensive. But the authors portray themselves in ways where I know they would be irritating to be around, even though their stories are so good. I have a few examples of this on my bookshelf, but the one that I think is the best example is Cancer Vixen by Marissa Marchetto.

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In this book, the Marchetto is works as a cartoonist living in NYC and writes pieces for Glamour and the New Yorker. She’s thus the kind of woman that is invested in the bullshit Glamour sells, like getting the perfect haircut and bikini waxes. She also really cares about status in a way that is off putting; for example, finding it important that she and her friend are at a party that Sarah Jessica Parker is also attending. The book, however, is fantastic. It talks about her cancer and treatment in a really accessible way. The visual metaphors for cancer, it’s treatment, and a lot of the toxic culture and infighting among women (especially in the kind of circles that Marchetto runs in) are amazing. She tells the story beautifully, and she makes personal growth (kind of). The book ends with her realizing that her priorities are fucked up, but even after her battle with cancer she still values things that show off her status as a cool New Yorker. All that being said, this is one of my fave books that I own. It’s a compelling story with great cartooning, but man, I think Marchetto would irritate me, and I think I wouldn’t be chic enough to even be on her radar.

This leads me to the ultimate example of an autobio cartoonist whose work I love but who I would NEVER want to hang out with is Aline Kominsky-Crumb:

Aline Kominsky-Crumb is the wife of Robert Crumb, which should give you some idea of what kind of woman she is. Robert Crumb was a huge influence on underground comics in the 1960s, but his work is sexist and racist as all hell (and actually, so is Aline’s but that’s a discussion for another time). It’s been fascinating seeing the tides turn on opinion of him (in SOME circles). Old straight white dude cartoonists see him as a god while younger queer, poc, and femme cartoonists (or any mix there of) who now dominate the indie comics scene REVILE him. Him and his underground comic pals’ sexism is one of the reasons Wimmin’s Comix was created. Aline actually started doing comics in Wimmin’s Comix but was cast out of the book for being a bad feminist when she started dating Crumb.


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In Need More Love (My copy is missing, along with a bunch of my other books, AND I’M STILL REALLY PISSED ABOUT IT!!!) she gossips about her drama with the Wimmin’s Comix Collective 30+ years later (the book is from the late 90s/ early 00s) in a way that makes it sound like it’s happening as she’s writing the book. While I bet there was validity to her side of it, when she recounts it in her comics she draws the artists at Wimmin’s Comix as gross, fat, completely undesirable femininazis. Her work is in some ways, insufferable. In her collected comic anthology by Drawn and Quarterly, she rehashes the same incidents that were traumatizing to her over and over in basically the same exact way. You can tell comics are cathartic for her, but it’s interesting how she doesn’t seem to grow as a person over the 40+ years collected in that book.

That being said, I adore her work! She is starved for male attention like I still am, she is obsessed with looking good (which I try to hide but I desperately want to be conventionally attractive again re:thinner), she loathes herself in ways I really relate to, and she is neurotic in a way only New York area Jews can be (she is from Long Island, my mother is from NJ).

That is something I should mention. While I did not grow up in a fully Jewish household, my mother is Jewish and I consider myself a cultural Jew (meaning I’m not into the religion but and tied to Judaism ethnically and culturally). So a TON of the stuff mentioned in this book resonates with me hard core, in a way I don’t usually see. A great example is how Aline recounts being pressured into things like getting a nose job and straightening her hair to look less ethnic (plastic surgery, nose jobs specifically, are a big thing in rich Jewish high schools).And then there’s just basic stuff like the food and Yiddish terms used where I go, “Ah yes, this makes me feel really at home.”

The Jewish culture (and neurosis) combined with the self loathing depicted with raw honesty and vulnerability (along with being kind of casual and flippant about it) is a rare mix that makes her one of my favorite cartoonists. THAT and she was doing autobio comics way before almost anybody (the only comics I like by her husband are the comics they did together that were based in reality or his retelling of Genisis- which he obviously didn’t write). She really doesn’t get enough credit for that. I’m not sure if the reason is because she is overshadowed by her husband, or that the only reason she is on anyone’s radar is because of her husband (it’s probably a mix of both),

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There is something I have only realized as I do a third run through of this blog post. Another core way I identify with Aline is that she is desperately wants to identify as an artist, which is why (though very sporadically) she ends up making comics. While my main incentive to create comics is the community it’s given to me, a big reason I keep doing art even while I feel disillusioned with it at various times (I’m getting through one of these periods right now, that’s why I’m taking a break from making stuff. I can see the light as the end of the self-doubt-tunnel though) is because I now see being an artist as a part of my identity. It took years for me to start accepting that I’m an artist, I had always associated all artists with the pretentiousness that comes when dealing with the fine art world. But when I found comics I started to get more comfortable self identifying that way.

There is one final person I want to mention that is in no way related to comics, and that is comedian Nicole Byer.

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Byer has a couple podcasts that I listen to. There is one called Why Won’t You Date Me? in which Byer explores relationships and talks about how she has never had a relationship even though she is 33. While I’m in a relationship now, I still often identify with the whole, “I’m alone and single forever,” message that this podcast plays into. I find Byer to be charming and interesting as the host of her podcasts. She also is one of my fave guests when I hear her on other podcasts (I subscribe to her on Laughable). That being said, her personality is A LOT to handle. It took a long time for me to even be able to get behind her on these shows, but the conversations were always so interesting that I eventually got used to her, and then endeared to her. But, I can’t imagine having a real conversation with her; it would be difficult to be around someone so loud and gregarious.

So, that’s pretty much all for this post. Obviously, I’m only judging these people by their art, so maybe they are actually lovely in person. But yeah, it’s weird when women talk about their lives and I am VERY interested in what they have to say, but am put-off by who they seem to be.

Lastly, in case anyone is wondering why these examples are all women, it’s because:

1) Unlikable men don’t entertain me the vast majority of the time.

2) Men’s art in general doesn’t resonate with me, so it’s not even worth writing about.

Bye bye!





News and Updates

Hello, hello!

I have been kind of all over the place lately with comics, my creative practice, and my life in general. However, things are pretty good. I just have been, I don’t know, kind of into other things more than actually making a lot of art and comics.

A big thing that happened recently is I got a bunch of my books out of storage, where they have been since August 2014. I am helping organizing an event with Square City Comics where members will be selling comics they don’t want. So, a big thing I’m tackling is culling my collection to see what I’m willing to sell.

This is my “maybe” pile.

This is my “maybe” pile.

I also have been really trying to exercise more and eat better, which is also time consuming. And I’ve got an ongoing full time temp gig as well. So, yeah, doing comics has not been at the top of the list.

However, I am slowly working on my newest zine, even if progress is slow. It’s a collection of art and comics related to dreams I’ve had since college. So far, I’ve completed 8 pages of work out of the who-knows-how-many. This zine is really an excuse for me to stretch myself artistically, so I’m experimenting with a lot of different styles of art and various mediums. I’m not sure how long the zine will be, but it will be a mix of black and white and color images and will be standard comic size.

A drawing from the best dream I ever had about a dream roller coaster, done in charcoal.

A drawing from the best dream I ever had about a dream roller coaster, done in charcoal.

Pages from two comics appearing in the zine. These dreams also took place in college. One is my typical ink and one is done in graphite.

Pages from two comics appearing in the zine. These dreams also took place in college. One is my typical ink and one is done in graphite.

Also:

1) I finished a zine about my three terrible dogs. It’s called Three Terrible Dogs. You can buy it on my Gumroad or my Etsy. The best part of this zine is that it was entirely funded by my Patreon! All the money I make off my Patreon goes directly back into my art, so it’s worth checking out if you are interested in my work.

The zine.

The zine.

The first page I ever made for the zine.

The first page I ever made for the zine.

The stars of the zine.

The stars of the zine.

2) I have NO IDEA how I didn’t write a post saying I finished Everything’s Fine Volume 3, but I did. It’s about how my relationship with my boyfriend has affected my mental health. It’s good! It’s also available in my store.

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3) I am currently part of an art show hosted at By The People and Monochrome Collective. It’s a very fancy art show and I did not know that when I applied. The link above and my calendar have all the info for showtimes, and the pieces are for sale.

Here’s some photos of some of my fave pieces, which I can’t attribute because I forgot to take photos of that and I’m a bad artist to my fellow artists:

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This was done by a 19 year old and it was their first show. Along with them, I was one of the very few artists that wasn’t like, I don’t know, REALLY REALLY involved in the DC fine art scene.

This was done by a 19 year old and it was their first show. Along with them, I was one of the very few artists that wasn’t like, I don’t know, REALLY REALLY involved in the DC fine art scene.

There were a series of pools paintings (like the one at the top) by  Elyse Harrison  that were fantastic and she was very nice to boot.

There were a series of pools paintings (like the one at the top) by Elyse Harrison that were fantastic and she was very nice to boot.

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And here’s my piece:

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Along with taking the opening SUPER seriously:

A sweaty mess after working a full work day then driving 1.5 hours to the opening (thanks DC traffic!)

A sweaty mess after working a full work day then driving 1.5 hours to the opening (thanks DC traffic!)

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4) I was interviewed of the FemiNerd podcast. You can find it on Soundcloud and iTunes, and possibly other places, as well as on their website. I name people in my interview that I never should have, and I regret it!

I think a reason I’ve been so slow to make comics is because I’ve been feeling under appreciated. My stuff hasn’t really sold well recently, my audience hasn’t really grown much lately, I have a obnoxious underdog complex, etc. I tabled at three shows in May and they were ok; seeing friends was good but I hate tabling. I’m thinking of taking the year off after this BUT THAT BEING SAID, I’ve got at least four more shows coming up this year, including SPX and MICE, even if they’re not on my calendar yet. The rest of the shows are on my calendar, which I keep updated (the reason the two shows I mentioned aren’t listed is because I don’t have my table info yet).

ANYWAY, YEAH, THINGS ARE STILL HAPPENING (even if they are slow). Let’s end this with a goofy ass photo of me tabling at DINK in May:

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Bye, until next time!

Quick News

I have had a hell of a last couple months so I’m not in a great place. As such, I haven’t really been working on comics but here’s some quick news:

I am part of a gallery show running through May at Atomic Books. Come on out and maybe buy my art!

I am tabling at Atomic Books tomorrow for Free Comic Book Day from 11:30 until ??? (I’ll be there probably at least two hours). I’m gonna try to table as much as possible this year and then probably take a break to reevaluate my life and my comics.

I got into another art show, more info on that as I get it.

My newest zine, Three Terrible Dogs, is available at my store and Gumroad.

THAT’S IT!

A Sort of Half-Assed Post About Wimmins Comix

Hello!

I don’t feel like working on comics right now, so I thought I’d do a blog post. I have been reading the Collected Wimmin’s Comix (published by Fantagraphics). I’ve had it since August, but am only now getting around to reading it (shout out to all the people out there that have stacks of books they need to read while still buying more books ALL THE TIME).

Anyway, I started reading Wimmin’s Comix and I’ve been blown away. Here are my thoughts:

  • I would say the vast majority of these comics don’t hold up, as with most underground comics from the 1960s-1980s (there are a few exceptions to this, for example Bitchy Bitch or Dykes to Watch Out For by Allison Bechdel. Allison Bechdel actually talks about how in one of her collections that her earliest work is pretty rough, but gay publications were so desperate for comics they would publish practically anything. The editors interviewed at the beginning of Complete Wimmin’s Comix say the same thing, especially for early issues). The overall quality of the comics definitely improve over time. While the early issues are rough but by the late 1980s issues there is some genuinely entertaining comics included in the issues.

  • I can’t believe how much sexist bullshit women put up with in the past. I don’t know how they handled it! While it’s true that sexism hasn’t gone away, you can see how it’s evolved and become more subtle through this collection. I have always cognitively known this, but seeing it written in the authors’ first person perspectives has made me internalize it in a way I never have before. I am really thankful for the hard fought battle that women from previous generations have fought on my behalf.

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This is the cover of the first issue. This and the above image are from a comic about women comic characters from the time rebelling against the sexist men in the comics they appear in.

This is the cover of the first issue. This and the above image are from a comic about women comic characters from the time rebelling against the sexist men in the comics they appear in.

  • The way these authors want to fall in love and find husbands while at the same time being part of a movement that calls out their oppression at men’s hands is interesting to see. Dating back in the 1960s must have been horrendous. The authors’ views on sex are crude and raw in a similar way to their male underground cartoonist counterparts.

  • I will say there is a lot of racism in this collection. There is a letter mentioned in the beginning of the anthology by one of the editors that was sent to them accusing the collective of not really being women, as women would never publish such racist and sexist material. The sexist material isn’t really apparent to me (minus small things, primarily that occasionally the authors tear other women down instead of lifting us all up.)

I think people are much more sensitive to mocking people for their appearance than even five years ago. It’s one of my pet peeves anyway, as someone who is uncomfortable with her appearance and is worried for being mocked for it.

I think people are much more sensitive to mocking people for their appearance than even five years ago. It’s one of my pet peeves anyway, as someone who is uncomfortable with her appearance and is worried for being mocked for it.

However, the racism really is present. The editor interviewed in the introduction was flippant about this letter as though the accusations were ridiculous. There is a lot of fetishizing native american and east asian cultures, and many of the black people portrayed in the comics have a racist phonetic accent (you literally have a comic celebrating Harriet Tubman saying things like, “no sir, masta”). To be fair, phonetic accents are much more common back in early comics than today (primarily because they are irritating as fuck to read), so these accents may not be seen as quite as egregious.

  • The comics from the 1960s and 1970s genuinely have characters saying, “groovy,” and I found that funny.

  • There are some LGBTQ comics in these issues as early as the 1970s, when being gay was still a crime. Seeing accounts of that lesbians dealing with that level of homophobia is both heart breaking and really compelling.

That’s all I can think of at the moment! I have a number of blog posts I want to write, but I need to focus on making more comics and am about to start another temp job next week, so that probably won’t happen in the foreseeable future.

Anyway, bye until next time!

Quick Update So I Can Get Back To Work

Hi!

I haven’t really posted here in a while because I am desperate to actually WORK ON COMICS vs doing back end shit like updating my website (which takes a long time when combined with other stuff like tabling and doing social media). I’m starting to form SERIOUS imposter syndrome so I want to plug a few things really quick and then go back to actually making work. 

- I was on the Paper Cuts Podcast. This was recorded at SPX but was put out this week. Feel free to marvel at how much I sound like a dumb bro. Listen to it here or download it wherever you listen to podcasts.

- My comic My Mother’s Story (originally part of the Comics For Choice anthology) was reposted to MUTHA Magazine earlier this year and was one of their top posts. Feel free to read all of their top posts for 2018 here. 

- I did a comic about food and memory for The Nib. Read that here

Alright, back to work on the next volume of Everything’s Fine. To get that zine when it’s done, you can sign up for my Patreon

Happy Holidays!